How to Treat Razor Bumps in the Pubic Area

You think you’ve just finished shaving your pubic area, but you notice something. It’s red, itchy, and painful. You have a razor bump in your pubic area. 

Razor bumps are common for many people who shave the sensitive skin of their genitals, so if you’re dealing with them, don’t beat yourself up about it. If you get a case of razor bumps around the pubic area, you can treat it right away and take steps to prevent future razor bumps. 

Here’s how to treat razor bumps in the pubic area once they pop up (and how to prevent them in the first place).

How to Treat Razor Bumps in the Pubic Area

How do you get razor bumps in the pubic area?

Razor bumps are small, red bumps that can appear after shaving. They’re called “razor bumps” because ingrown hairs from shaving cause them. These bumps develop when hair shafts become trapped beneath the skin’s surface. Ingrown hairs can be painful, itchy, and embarrassing, especially in a sensitive area like your pubic region!

Are razor bumps common in the pubic area?

Yes! If you’ve ever shaved or waxed the areas around your genitals, you’re at risk of getting razor bumps. The good news is that if you follow these tips for preventing razor bumps in the future, they’ll be less likely to appear on your body again.

How to prevent razor bumps in sensitive areas

  1. Avoid shaving for at least 48 hours after having sex (to let any cuts heal).
  2. Use a sharp razor instead of pressing the razor hard for a close shave. 
  3. Apply plenty of moisturizer after shaving.

These tips will help keep your skin in good condition and hopefully prevent problems from razor bumps. 

How to treat razor bumps in the pubic area

If you already notice a red, bumpy rash on your skin, it is too late for prevention. It’s time to focus on treatment.

Make sure to wash the area gently with warm water and soap each day. That will help to cleanse your skin and prevent infection.

Apply a topical cream that soothes razor burn or ingrown hairs, such as aloe vera gel or witch hazel solution.

Apply a warm compress to the affected area for 10 minutes, up to three times per day, to increase blood flow to the area.

If your symptoms don’t go away or become worse, talk to a doctor about other treatments or prescription medications. 

Tips for preventing razor bumps in the pubic area in the future

If you get razor bumps, treat them right away and take steps to prevent them from coming back.

If you get razor bumps, treat them right away and take steps to prevent them from coming back.

Conclusion

Razor bumps are no fun, but they’re also nothing to be embarrassed about. Lots of people get them, and you can take steps to prevent them and treat them. Now that you know how razor bumps form and some tips for getting rid of them, give the methods we covered a try! 

If you try to relieve razor bumps on your own, but they won’t go away, it’s time to talk to a medical professional. 

Learn More

If razor bumps have you bothered and you want to talk to an online doctor, Razor Bumps, Inc.’s board-certified physicians are available now through easy virtual video visits. Find out more by chatting with us now.

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Disclaimer: The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this site are not intended to substitute diagnosis or treatment by a medical professional. Always seek the advice of a licensed physician for any questions you may have regarding a specific condition.

How Long Can Razor Bumps Last?

How Long Can Razor Bumps Last?

Razor bumps can be a bother. When they show up, you want them gone fast. 

Also known as pseudofolliculitis barbae, razor bumps are small red bumps that can occur after shaving. They make your skin look bumpy and feel irritated. When left alone to heal and given proper skincare, razor bumps typically last for about 2-3 weeks. However, severe cases can go on for months.

Razor bumps are a common problem for men who shave their faces regularly, but they can affect women too. In this article, we’ll take a look at what razor bumps are, how to get rid of them, how long they last, and most importantly: how to prevent them from popping up in the first place. Read on to learn more!

After shaving, you may have seen these bumps on your face or neck and wondered how long they’d last. Razor bumps can be frustrating. These ingrown hairs can range from mildly irritating to extremely painful and unsightly. 

How Long Can Razor Bumps Last?

Razor Bumps Vary, Severe Cases Last Longer

Razor bumps are caused by ingrown hairs (also called pseudofolliculitis barbae), which develop when hair shaves off unevenly and curls back into the skin instead of growing out the way it should. Mild cases of razor bumps will resolve in one to two weeks. Unfortunately, more severe cases may take much longer to heal. Sometimes, razor bumps cause permanent scarring that does not go away. The resulting irritation looks like small pimples that don’t go away with time or regular cleaning.

Luckily there are steps you can take to reduce razor bumps.

Stop Razor Bumps From Lasting Longer

If you want to prevent razor bumps, here’s what you need to know:

Razor Bumps Can Turn Into Folliculitis

Folliculitis is a skin condition resulting from ingrown hairs. It’s caused by shaving, which damages your hair follicles, making it easier for bacteria to grow inside them and cause inflammation.

Ingrown hairs are common in the armpits, groin area and face due to these areas being shaved most often. The inflammation and redness present on the skin may last for up to two weeks until the hair falls out or grows back in its natural direction, which will leave you feeling smooth again!

Shaving Causes Razor Bumps to Last Longer

Common causes of razor bumps include shaving too close to the skin and using blades that cut too closely. Razor bumps can also result from shaving in the direction the hair grows. Shaving in this way leaves behind tiny hairs, which then become ingrown hairs when you attempt to push them back out through subsequent shaves. To avoid this, try shaving in the opposite direction of your hair growth (against it).

When it comes to how long razor bumps last and how they’re treated, there are a few factors at play:

If you take care of your skin and protect it from further injury, razor bumps will heal in 2-3 weeks.

Stop Razor Bumps Before They Start

You can prevent razor bumps by selecting the right razor and using proper shaving techniques. 

The best method is shaving in the direction of hair growth. Avoid using dull razor blades with too much pressure or shaving in one direction without changing your angle after every stroke.

You should also leave your hair alone for long periods to avoid irritation. Trimming or shaving only when necessary will also help reduce irritation by preventing overgrowth of ingrown hairs and keeping the area from becoming irritated from constant grooming.

As you can see, there are many ways to prevent razor bumps from happening. If you follow these tips and strategies, you will be able to avoid razor bumps with ease.

It is important to note that every person’s skin is different, and what works for one may not work for another. You should try out different methods to find one that works best with your skin type and hair texture.

Razor Bumps Treatment

The best treatment for razor bumps is exfoliation and pushing hairs out of the skin through trimming or shaving only when necessary.

Exfoliating your skin will help remove dead skin cells that can irritate and reduce ingrown hairs. 

Try using an over-the-counter exfoliant cream for sensitive skin.

If razor bumps persist, you need to talk to a doctor about your skin condition.

Razor bumps are caused by shaving, but you can prevent them if you’re mindful of how you shave.

You can avoid razor bumps if you’re conscious of how you shave.

Conclusion

Hopefully, you better understand razor bumps and what to do about them. To keep razor bumps from sticking around for two to three weeks, you should try to prevent them altogether. Be sure to follow these simple steps for a safe shave.

Disclaimer: The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this site are not intended to substitute diagnosis or treatment by a medical professional. Always seek the advice of a licensed physician for any questions you may have regarding a specific condition.

What Do Razor Bumps Look Like on the Face?

What Do Razor Bumps Look Like on the Face?

Have you ever noticed bumps on your face after shaving? If so, perhaps you’ve heard of razor bumps and assumed that’s what those little ingrown hair-like cysts were. But were they razor bumps? And what do razor bumps look like on the face?

Razor bumps look like small ingrown hair cysts. They may vary in color depending on a person’s skin tone. Typically, razor bumps are raised and irritated. The skin bump may look red, pink, or a darkened color. Sometimes, they become infected and may look yellow or whitish in the center.

So how do you know if you truly have razor bumps? Moreover, what can you do if it looks like razor bumps on your face? Keep reading if you or someone you know has had these facial bumps and you want to know more.

How Razor Bumps Look on the Face

Razor bumps is the name of a skin problem that shows up on the face and neck after shaving. Usually, these bumps are small. Razor bumps typically measure only 2 to 5 mm in diameter. 

If you notice bumps on your face, you can look closely at the face with a mirror. The small cysts will appear near hair roots. Watch for signs of irritation at the hair root. Signs of razor bumps on the face can include:

Facial hairs cut with sharp edges, like a razor blade, can grow back into the skin. As a result, a shiny hump or cyst forms on the face. They are also called shave bumps or barber’s bumps. 

Men with coarse or tightly curled hair see razor bumps more often. This hair type grows easily back into the skin after shaving. More than half of African American men have had this condition. 

Only a licensed physician can diagnose razor bumps. If you have signs of these barber bumps and they don't go away, it's best to talk to a doctor.

Causes of Razor Bumps on the Face

The medical term for razor bumps is Pseudofolliculitis Barbae. Traumatic folliculitis of the beard is another name for it, even though razor bumps can appear in other body parts. The condition is caused by shaving. Hence the name, razor bumps. 

Bad shaving habits can worsen razor bumps. For example, pulling the skin tightly or pressing on the razor while shaving can cause hairs to be cut too short. It can aggravate razor bumps. Also, using dull razor blades can cause trauma to the skin. They pull the hair shaft during shaving, which can worsen razor bumps.  

Also, men who suffer from razor bumps find that shaving too frequently makes matters worse. If you suspect you have razor bumps on the face, you should avoid shaving the affected area until it is healed.

What To Do for Razor Bumps on the Face

You can do several things if you think you have razor bumps. Some you can do at home by yourself. Others may require you to see a doctor.

Stop Shaving

The easiest and most effective way to treat razor bumps is to stop the cause of the problem. Yes, you guessed it. That means to stop shaving. Allowing facial hair to grow freely can stop the irritation. According to the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, letting a beard grow naturally is a 100% effective treatment. 

Train the Hair

Another solution is to train the hair. Some doctors recommend brushing facial hair to encourage it to grow a certain way. Doing so may decrease razor bumps. 

A beard brush can help tame unruly hairs. Starting near the ears and brushing down toward the chin in smooth strokes can encourage hairs to grow out straight. Men should brush face hair at least once a day.

Change Your Routine

The third solution for razor bumps on your face is to try changing up your shaving routine. Try different products or methods to reduce bumps. 

Softening the hairs before shaving in the shower or with a hot wet towel on the face helps. Men can also look for lubricating shave gels or try an electric razor. Different methods can help lessen bumps. 

If you try these at-home solutions but still have a hard time with razor bumps, then it might be time to talk to a doctor. 

Summary

So now you know how to prevent bothersome bumps on your face and how to tell if you’re dealing with razor bumps. The ingrown hair-like cysts on their face can vary slightly from person to person. Still, razor bumps are usually swollen, discolored, and bothersome. 

If you are still unsure you have razor bumps on your face and want to talk to an expert, go ahead and chat with us to find out more about Razorbumps, Inc. We have top board-certified physicians available to see and treat your skin problem by video appointment now. To find out more, click BOOK APPOINTMENT.

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Disclaimer: The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this site are not intended to substitute diagnosis or treatment by a medical professional. Always seek the advice of a licensed physician for any questions you may have regarding a specific condition.

How Is Pseudofolliculitis Barbae Diagnosed?

How Is Pseudofolliculitis Barbae Diagnosed?

Pseudofolliculitis barbae is a common skin condition that many adults will face at some point in their lives. With so many people affected, you might wonder how it is diagnosed.

Pseudofolliculitis barbae is typically diagnosed by physical examination by a licensed healthcare provider, such as a doctor or advanced nurse practitioner. Medical tests, including studying skin tissue samples under a microscope in a laboratory, may also aid in the physician’s diagnosis. 

So how does a doctor examine pseudofolliculitis barbae? And how can someone find a physician to treat this problem? Read on to find out.

Want to speak to a board certified physician? Book an appointment today!

How Pseudofolliculitis Is Barbae Diagnosed

Anyone who shaves is at risk of developing "shave bumps," "razor bumps," or ingrown hairs. But African American men are affected most. Studies show that between 45% and 83% of African American men who shave will develop pseudofolliculitis barbae. Men of other ethnicities and women too can experience this problem. It most often appears in the face but can also show up under the arms, in the bikini area, or the legs.

Physicians or practitioners can diagnose pseudofolliculitis barbae by physical examination at a simple doctor's visit. With any physician encounter, the first part of the diagnosis will be an interview. 

The doctor will ask the patient questions to figure out what is wrong or what the complaint is. Some common questions a provider might ask when diagnosing pseudofolliculitis barbae are:

In addition to taking a history, the doctor will observe the skin for any changes. Small red bumps, tenderness, and itching are all signs that could alert the doctor to a possible diagnosis of pseudofolliculitis barbae. 

How To Find a Doctor for Pseudofolliculitis Barbae

Finding a doctor for pseudofolliculitis barbae is easier than ever. A dermatology or skin specialist referral may not be necessary. Many primary care doctors can diagnose and treat this problem with a quick check-up. 

There is also good news for patients who do not have a doctor. When someone doesn't have a doctor or is unsure how to find one, a virtual physician is a great option. Online doctor visits are often less expensive than going to a doctor's office. And in many cases, patients can book them faster. Most virtual physicians offer convenient appointment times, and some even have same-day bookings.

Whether online or in-person, it is best to contact the doctor and ask for an appointment to evaluate a skin condition. Give the doctor as much information as possible. If you think it's pseudofolliculitis barbae, then let the provider know when you book your visit.

Summary

A licensed healthcare provider is the only one who can say for sure if a skin rash might be a case of pseudofolliculitis barbae or something more serious. Luckily, an appointment to see a physician can be simple and inexpensive. Relief may be as close as a phone call or video visit today.

Connect with Our Board-Certified Physicians

Our caring experts can help answer your skin questions. To meet a top board-certified physician, book an appointment today. 

Sources

  1. Goldstein, A., Goldstein, B. (2019, April 19). Pseudofolliculitis barbae. UpToDate. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/pseudofolliculitis-barbae#H87492034
  2. Levinbook, W. (2020, November). Pseudofolliculitis barbae. Merck Manual. https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dermatologic-disorders/hair-disorders/pseudofolliculitis-barbae#v38068013

What is a “Shaving Waiver”?

A shaving waiver is a type of medical release or exemption form. Men who have skin conditions may need this form for work.

Shaving waivers are also called “no-shave waivers.” They are for men with certain skin conditions. Sometimes shaving causes serious skin problems. A medical doctor can complete this release to show why a man should not be required to shave his face.

Why would an individual need a shaving waiver, and where can you get one? 

What is a “Shaving Waiver”?

The shaving waiver shows employers and supervisors of organizations that it would be unhealthy for a man to shave. A shaving waiver must be necessary to prove that an individual should not have to shave for medical reasons. 

For some men, facial shaving causes:

According to Kennard Law P.C., “from a legal perspective, employers may require male employees to shave as long as it does not infringe on their civil rights or cause undue hardship.” For this reason, it may be necessary to show proof that shaving creates a problem for the individual.

Speak to a virtual doctor today about a shaving waiver!

Who Needs a Shaving Waiver?

Some men in sales or marketing, law enforcement, or sports may be required to shave their faces. Other jobs that require men to be clean-shaven include those where employees may be exposed to fire or hazardous chemicals and would be required to wear respirator equipment. 

​In the military, this waiver is also called a military shaving profile. The Department of Defense expects its male members to maintain zero visible facial hair, other than a neatly maintained mustache, when in uniform. This requirement stems from the five elements of dress and personal appearance: neatness, cleanliness, safety, uniformity, and military image.

In some cases, when shaving causes serious health concerns to the individual, this medical form may be necessary.

Connect with Our Board-Certified Physicians

Do you need a shaving waiver? You can schedule a virtual doctor visit with one of our board-certified physicians about a shaving waiver.

We are now offering evening and weekend appointments. My Virtual Physician treats skin conditions and much more. Our caring experts provide telemedicine services for your healthcare needs, all from the convenience of your home.





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    Please do not post information here respecting your medical history, your symptoms, any diagnosis you may have been given, the names of any medications you may be taking, or any other specific information about your health or healthcare. Please limit your posting to such matters as days and times you’d like to be seen or preferences, if any, for a provider.

    Our shaving waiver policy is as follows:
    i. No waiver is issued without a video/audio visit with one of our licensed doctors,
    ii. A $49.99 administration fee is required for all waivers.This covers the time to prepare all documents for you to submit to your HR/Compliance department
    iii.If we are in network with your insurance, we will attempt to bill the insurance plan for the doctors time to conduct the video visit. If we do not get paid by insurance, we will not place any additional financial responsibility on the person seeing the shaving waiver.

    Privacy is very important to us. We never share any of your information with anyone, nor do we ever sell it. You can be secure knowing we value and endeavor always to safeguard your data and online presence. For more details, please see our Privacy Policy

    If you have suggestions for other topics you want to read about, let us know! Don’t forget to follow us on social media.

    How to Deal with Razor Bumps Down There

    Many women enjoy the feel of soft-shaven skin. But the red, itchy patches that come after can be a real pain. Razor bumps in sensitive areas like the bikini line are annoying. So how can men and women deal with razor bumps down there?

    Razor bumps, technically called pseudofolliculitis barbae, are a common skin complaint. Fortunately, they are preventable to some degree. By protecting skin before, during, and after hair removal, men and women can minimize the effects of razor bumps. 

    If you're wondering how to save your skin, check out these tips to steer clear of painful razor bumps.

    how to deal with razor bumps down there

    How to Deal with Razor Bumps Down There

    Razor bumps are an uncomfortable sign of skin irritation. For those who already have them, the first step is to keep them from getting worse. 

    • Do not touch razor bumps. It is important not to disturb healing. 
    • Keep the skin clean and dry. 
    • Avoid shaving over irritated skin. 
    • Do not pick the area to avoid infection.

    A compress made with salt water can also help soothe the skin. Saltwater cleans and heals the skin by osmosis. To make a "saline soak" at home:

    1. Add one tablespoon of salt to warm water.
    2. Soak a clean cloth or gauze pad with the solution.
    3. Apply the compress directly.
    4. Leave the saline soak in place 5 to 15 minutes three times a day.

    Consider adding a couple of drops of an essential oil, like tea tree oil, to the saline solution for more relief.

    When bumps don't go away or become more painful, it may be best to see a doctor. 

    A physician can tell if the problem is razor bumps or may be something else. Some doctors use antibiotic gels, steroids, or retinoids to treat severe cases. 

    how to deal with razor bumps down there

    Preventing Razor Bumps

    They say an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. When it comes to razor bumps, it's very true. 

    Here's how you can lower your risk of getting razor bumps from shaving.

    • Use a thicker shaving gel.
    • Avoid stretching or pulling the skin tight when shaving.
    • Try products containing salicylic or glycolic acid on the skin to lessen bumps.

    Find more tips on how to prevent razor bumps here.

    Summary

    Taking care of skin before, during, and after hair removal can go a long way in preventing razor bumps.

    If you've tried to treat pseudofolliculitis barbae yourself but find the situation getting worse, it may be time to check with a doctor.

    Connect with Our Board-Certified Physicians

    Are you looking for a doctor near you to treat your sensitive issues? My Virtual Physician has board-certified physicians who can address gynecological and primary care problems via video visits.

    If you would like to talk with a board-certified doctor, you can schedule your appointment online now. My Virtual Physician offers health screening, lab tests, and counseling to meet all of your healthcare needs.

     





      Please do not post information here respecting your medical history, your symptoms, any diagnosis you may have been given, the names of any medications you may be taking, or any other specific information about your health or healthcare. Please limit your posting to such matters as days and times you’d like to be seen or preferences, if any, for a provider.

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      Can Men With Full Beards Wear N95 Masks?

      Masks have become a permanent accessory for many U.S. workers. Unfortunately, facial hair makes masking difficult. Some workers required to wear personal protective equipment, like respirator masks, find it especially hard. You may even wonder, how can men with full beards wear N95 masks?

      An N95 respirator mask is a protective device made to fit tightly against the face to filter 95% of particles from the air entering the nose and mouth. As a result, men with full beards cannot wear N95 masks safely or effectively. Facial hair that comes between the skin and mask edges prevents a tight fit and good seal. 

      So what can men do if they have facial hair but need respiratory protection? There are options for men in such situations. Read on to find out. 

      Jobs Requiring N95 Respirator Mask Protection

      Many jobs require respiratory protection. Here are just a few of the workers that may be required to wear an N95 mask in on-the-job situations.

      In many of these jobs, facial hair is not allowed. Therefore, some men choose to shave their facial hair.  

      Unfortunately for some of these workers, going clean-shaven causes problems. Sometimes shaving causes adverse effects. 

      The face and neck are sensitive parts of the body. Facial shaving may result in some very uncomfortable skin conditions. Problems created by shaving may include folliculitis, painful skin infections, and hyperpigmentation. For men suffering from significant health conditions like these, limiting or even avoiding shaving may be necessary. 

      A shaving waiver, also known as a shaving profile or “no-shave waiver,” can help individuals with certain conditions. A shaving profile is a medical release or exemption form. The document, completed by a physician, explains why a man should not be required to shave his face due to health concerns. 

      Shaving waivers allow men to forgo shaving and get the right respiratory protection for them. Men with facial hair do not have to risk inhaling unsafe vapors.

      Alternative Forms of Respirator Protection

      Some respirator masks do not require a face seal. These types are a better option for bearded employees. 

      Specifically, positive-pressure respirators worn over facial hair or beards work to filter the air. A hood-and-helmet type mask uses continuous airflow to protect employees.

      One example that is available to workers is called the Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR) mask. This loose-fitting respirator uses a blower to pass air through a filter before sending it to the face. Typically, PAPR masks are lightweight and battery-operated. Also, PAPR masks do not require Fit-Testing. 

      One drawback is their cost. Most employees would not want to invest in their own PAPR. Those looking for a PAPR respirator can purchase a simple version online for around $100. However, some are upwards of $1000. Batteries and chargers may double the expense.

      Although these masks are more costly, they offer superior protection. According to this article by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a PAPR mask may offer an Assigned Protection Factor (APF) of 1000, where an N95 respirator only has an APF of 10. The higher the protection factor, the safer it is.

      Medical Evaluation for PAPR Respirators

      The use of a PAPR mask does require a physician’s medical evaluation. It is a respirator, and therefore OSHA’s requirements to evaluate an employee before requiring the mask applies to this type.

      Men with full beards can find respiratory protection that won’t cause health problems or skin conditions. The first step is a medical evaluation by a licensed physician. 

      Men interested in finding out if a PAPR mask or shaving waiver for their employer would be right for them should talk to a doctor. 

      Connect with Our Board-Certified Physicians

      My Virtual Physician now offers consultations for shaving waivers in some states. Fill out the contact form below to speak to one of our board-certified physicians about a shaving waiver.





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        Please do not post information here respecting your medical history, your symptoms, any diagnosis you may have been given, the names of any medications you may be taking, or any other specific information about your health or healthcare. Please limit your posting to such matters as days and times you’d like to be seen or preferences, if any, for a provider.

        Our shaving waiver policy is as follows:
        i. No waiver is issued without a video/audio visit with one of our licensed doctors,
        ii. A $49.99 administration fee is required for all waivers.This covers the time to prepare all documents for you to submit to your HR/Compliance department
        iii.If we are in network with your insurance, we will attempt to bill the insurance plan for the doctors time to conduct the video visit. If we do not get paid by insurance, we will not place any additional financial responsibility on the person seeing the shaving waiver.

        Privacy is very important to us. We never share any of your information with anyone, nor do we ever sell it. You can be secure knowing we value and endeavor always to safeguard your data and online presence. For more details, please see our Privacy Policy