Can Barbershops Treat Razor Bumps?

Barbershops are a place for men to sit back and relax. They are also a place for gentlemen to discuss sports, politics, and current events. Going to the barbershop is an experience more than an errand for a haircut or beard trim. Barbers are valued for their skill and expertise in cutting men’s hair. So, can they treat skin conditions caused by shaving?

In general, barbershops do not perform any treatment for skin conditions resulting from shaving. For their safety and the well-being of their customers, barbers cannot work with any open wounds or skin that appears infected. Men with razor bumps should not go to the barbershop for treatment but rather seek medical advice from a licensed physician.

Men who suspect they might have razor bumps can try at-home remedies to ease skin irritation or find a doctor to help. To find out more, read on.

Can Barbershops Treat Razor Bumps?

What Barbers Do For Razor Bumps

When a customer goes to the barbershop for a shave or trim, the barber will likely ask the client if there are any sensitivities or skin conditions A barber can refuse to shave or cut a person’s hair in some cases. They could turn the client away if the skin shows signs of the following:

Barbers are not licensed to treat skin conditions and are careful not to cause injury. Public health and safety are primary concerns for barbers.

If a man has mild razor bumps on the head or neck, a barber may agree to proceed with the service. Many barbershops apply towels to the face or neck. Warm towels before shaving increase blood circulation to the skin and can soothe irritation. Cool towels after shaving constrict pores and provide a cooling sensation. While both treatments are beneficial for the skin, they are not intended to heal razor bumps.

At-Home Remedies for Razor Bumps

Men with razor bumps can try at-home remedies to alleviate discomfort and swelling.

Here are some over-the-counter products to try.

Another great do-it-yourself remedy for facial razor bumps is steam treatments. Warm steam on the skin causes pores to open, releasing dead skin cells, dirt, and other debris. Trapped particles in the skin cause pimples and ingrown hairs. In addition, an all-natural steam treatment improves blood flow to the skin, which can help heal compromised skin. Here are steps to try an at-home steam facial.

  1. Fill a pot with warm water.
  2. Bring water to a boil on the stove.
  3. Remove the boiling water from the stove and place it in a sink.
  4. Hold your face about a foot away from the hot water and lean over the rising steam. You can use a towel over your head like a tent to hold in steam.
  5. Allow the steam to penetrate your pores for about 5-10 minutes.
  6. Finish by splashing skin with cool water.
  7. Pat the skin dry.
  8. Follow by a skin toner and moisturizer.

Consider adding herbs, tea, or essential oils to the boiling water to pamper your skin.

A word of warning, steaming is not recommended for some. Individuals with eczema, for example, can cause skin irritation. If you are unsure if a steam facial is safe for you, ask a doctor.

Finding a Doctor for Razor Bumps

Individuals can also make an appointment with a doctor’s office or a dermatologist if they have questions about razor bumps.

Thanks to telemedicine, the easiest and fastest way to talk with a doctor about razor bumps is to book an appointment with a virtual physician. Services like Razor Bumps, Inc offer inexpensive, convenient appointments for skin problems for patients who do not have a doctor or cannot get in to see their regular doctor.

Summary

In short, men with razor bumps can try to alleviate skin irritation from razor bumps or find a doctor to help. While barbers are highly skilled at their craft, they are not qualified to treat any skin condition. Razor bump treatment is best left to the professionals.

If you have questions for the Razor Bumps, Inc physicians, don’t wait! Contact us now.

Sources:

Code of Ethics”. americanbarber.org. Accessed April 14, 2022.

Is Steaming Your Face Good for Your Skin?”. health.clevelandclinic.org. Accessed April 14, 2022.

Disclaimer: The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this site are not intended to substitute diagnosis or treatment by a medical professional. Always seek the advice of a licensed physician for any questions you may have regarding a specific condition.